Review: Moth Smoke


Mohsin Hamid’s 2000 debut novel “Moth Smoke” is a rare example of transgressive South Asian fiction, and does an incredible job of showing how the conflicts within a society come to be mirrored within individuals as well. Unlike Mohammed Hanif’s satirical look at Pakistani society in “A Case of Exploding Mangoes,” none of the characters … Continue reading Review: Moth Smoke

Review: Descent into Chaos


Pakistani journalist Ahmed Rashid leapt into prominence outside of his home country when, post 9/11, Western journalists poured into Afghanistan to report on the conflict there. Little had been written about the Taliban at that time, and so many of them clutched Rashid’s first book published in 1999, “Taliban.” Since that time, Rashid has become … Continue reading Review: Descent into Chaos

Review: The Wandering Falcon


Hope does not die like an animal – quick and sudden. It is more like a plant, which slowly withers away. -“The Wandering Falcon,” by Jamil Ahmad There is no other book written in English that captures the spirit of the Pashtun people as well as “The Wandering Falcon” by Jamil Ahmad. Although I have … Continue reading Review: The Wandering Falcon

The Poetry of the Taliban


At your Christmas, Bagram is alit and bright, On my Eid, even the rays of the sun are dead, Suddenly at midnight, your bombs bring the light, In our houses, even the oil lamps are turned off. On Eid, by Khepulwaak Afghanistan is a country of poets. “The Poetry of the Taliban” would seem to … Continue reading The Poetry of the Taliban

Review: Earth & Ashes


Atiq Rahimi is one of several Afghan writers who has become well known in the West. Born in Kabul, he studied at the Lycée Esteqlal where he learned French. After the Soviet invasion, he and his family fled first to Pakistan, and then to Paris where he studied at the Sorbonne. Rahimi first began to … Continue reading Review: Earth & Ashes