Review: A Flag for Sunrise


You might find it unusual for me to post a review of a book that was published in 1981, but hear me out. The sheer volume of books published every year, and the way that they are marketed – very intensely for a short period of time – means that inevitably we all miss books … Continue reading Review: A Flag for Sunrise

On Algorithms and Genre


It’s generally accepted that in modern literature there are two broad kinds of fiction – literary fiction and genre fiction. While it is often said that the difference is that genre fiction is principally concerned with plot and convention, while literary fiction elevates character and theme, this is not the only difference. The sub-text, sometimes … Continue reading On Algorithms and Genre

Review: The Artist’s Journey


Steven Pressfield’s latest book on writing, “The Artist’s Journey,” is both a wake-up call and a how-to for creatives of all stripes. Using the structure of the “hero’s journey,” he describes how to overcome resistance and become the artist we wish to be. The idea of the “hero’s journey” was popularizing by Joseph Campbell’s 1949 … Continue reading Review: The Artist’s Journey

Four Famous Bookstores


I am an admitted bibliophile and so have trouble walking past a bookstore, any bookstore, without at least taking a quick look. But in all of my travels, there are a few bookstores that really stand out, and as I thought about them together, I realized a few reasons why that are perhaps not that … Continue reading Four Famous Bookstores

The City & the City


As you likely already know, I like to write reviews of backlist books that I think are important for people to read. A lot of what I’ve reviewed is connected to Afghanistan, the setting of my recently published novel. In this case, I want to draw your attention to one of my favourite novels, which incidentally … Continue reading The City & the City

Review: Moth Smoke


Mohsin Hamid’s 2000 debut novel “Moth Smoke” is a rare example of transgressive South Asian fiction, and does an incredible job of showing how the conflicts within a society come to be mirrored within individuals as well. Unlike Mohammed Hanif’s satirical look at Pakistani society in “A Case of Exploding Mangoes,” none of the characters … Continue reading Review: Moth Smoke